Measuring cervical spine motion – Virtual presentation @UniofOxford

Outside Pembroke College, Oxford, 1st October 2013

Outside Pembroke

I was delighted to be able to attend the NIHR Statistics Group – Imaging in
Translational Research Meeting at Pembroke College, University of Oxford. Around 100 statisticians and clinicians from around the country attended to hear about how the transition from basic science (if you like, the conception of and the invention of something) through to clinical usefulness, where the imaging technique is shown to be good enough to make a positive impact on patient care, might happen.

This was timely for the work we are doing at IMRCI with quantitative fluoroscopy (QF) as it could play an important role in the diagnosis and managment of neck and back pain. A poster highlighting some of my work with Professor Alan Breen on the measurement of cervical spine inter-vertebral motion with QF was included in a booklet supplied to all delegates. This work was firstly to demonstrate how reliable QF is at measuring cervical inter-vertebral motion (it’s reliable), and secondly to find out how much this motion changes over time (4 weeks) in people without neck pain receiving no treatment (on average, a few degrees). This will help me determine whether motion changes in patients with neck pain receiving spinal manipulation (over 4 weeks) are larger than this, or within “normal” limits. Put another way, is spinal manipulation associated with changes in inter-vertebral motion?

It is important that this work is exposed to the calibre and expertise of this type of audience – hopefully it survived their critical faculties!

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